Y10 LOs or Learning Objectives for students
Students will be able to:
  1. Describe ways in which cultural interaction can affect communities and societies
  2. Explain causes of prejudice, discrimination and unfairness and identify possible solutions
Key concepts that students will be learning about this year: Assimilation, segregation, integration, genocide, bilculturalism, racism ,multiculturalism, inequality, prejudice, discrimination, communities, identity, traditions, culture, heritage, immigration, stereotypes


Year Tens at Opotiki College are also doing the SPEC PROGRAMME to support their learning needs and build their ability to be independent, inquiring and successful learners. http://www.spec.org.nz/ The SPEC courses provide a framework for a self-directed approach to learning and a focus on Key Competency development. There are three levels of certificate qualifications, and students are placed in the appropriate level.
  • Students choose the tasks they are interested in.
  • They are taught how to plan and break tasks into manageable units.
  • This process helps their time management and ability to manage themselves more efficiently.
  • The courses allow for different learning styles, so students are able to negotiate the types of evidence they will generate for each task.
  • There is also a flexible time frame and although there are time frames for students to finish files, if they miss the first deadline there is a second date to aim for.
  • Students build up portfolios of evidence over an extended period of time, showing how they have developed the Key Competencies.
  • When portfolios are complete they are submitted to SPEC for verification.
  • Verification meetings are held twice a year in local geographical areas.
  • These meetings are some of the best professional development opportunities.

The SPEC courses provide a framework for a self directed approach to learning and a focus on Key Competency development. There are three levels of certificate qualifications, and students are placed in the appropriate level.
  • Students choose the tasks they are interested in.
  • They are taught how to plan and break tasks into manageable units.
  • This process helps their time management and ability to manage themselves more efficiently.
  • The courses allow for different learning styles, so students are able to negotiate the types of evidence they will generate for each task.
  • There is also a flexible time frame and although there are time frames for students to finish files, if they miss the first deadline there is a second date to aim for.
  • Students build up portfolios of evidence over an extended period of time, showing how they have developed the Key Competencies.
  • When portfolios are complete they are submitted to SPEC for verification.
  • Verification meetings are held twice a year in local geographical areas.
  • These meetings are some of the best professional development opportunities.

B) Cultural interaction outside NZ (historic)

See Gavin Frosts resources
Slave trade

Aborigines: pre Europe, racism, attempted genocide on Tasmania, Nazis, Rwanda

Adaptation? Do NZ here?

Segregation: Australia, USA with Indians, Blacks, South Africa

Assimilation in Australia, RATM song, solutions? Do NZ here?

Inca, Aztecs and Tibet: use for homework

eg Age of Discovery and colonisation: New world foods, adopting Western religions, adopting non-Western religions, technology, ideas such as money, the scientific method, land loss, war, disease
Racism: popular in late 1800s and early 1900s, USA, Germany, South Africa
Expression 1: Assimilation egin Australia with the Stolen Generation see movies Rabbit Proof Fence and The Sapphires, in South Africa, in Native Schools where Maori could not speak te Reo. Maori cultural renaissance in 1970s was a reaction to this. Recap Year 9 LO 2 here - Describe reasons why people sustain their culture eg identity (who am I), traditions – (things that stay the same), heritage (honouring forebearers)
Expression 2: Segregation – eg USA and South Africa
Expression 3: Genocide eg Slave Trade, Nazis, Rwanda (film: Hotel Rwanda)

C) Cultural interaction in NZ (historic)
Cultural adaptation of Maori, intermarriage, sport, urbanisation, biculturalism due to the Treaty. Push and Pull factors. Effects on Maori, effects on Pakeha.
Racism: popular in late 1800s and early 1900s, USA, Germany, South Africa
Expression 1: Assimilation in Native Schools where Maori could not speak te Reo
Expression 2: Maori Renaissance of culture since 1970s

D) Cultural interaction in NZ (post 1960s)
(foreigners moving to NZ from the 1960s) the different cultures in NZ- Maori, Pakeha or NZ European , Pacifica, Chinese, Japanese. Push and Pull factors. Effects on immigrants, effects on New Zealanders. Eg. What challenges do people face in new countries? language, religion, culture, food, money
Positive effects: meeting each other, working together, solving problems and issues together, going to school with each other, becoming friends with each other, playing sport with each other, marrying/having children with each other, learning about each others cultures, understanding each other, experiencing each others cultures eg foods, ceremonies. Cultural exchange of ideas eg Indigenous sustainability, Maori TV and te Reo. Auckland: the place where this happens the most. Multicultural NZ?
Describe reasons why people sustain their culture eg identity (who am I), traditions – (things that stay the same), heritage (honouring forebearers)
Negative effects: eg racism and intolerance
Solutions to negative cultural interaction